The submarines I served aboard for USNR Active Duty and Submarine Reserve Duty

Hit Counter
since 09-27-01

Updated 10-21-14

with USS Parche SS-384, AGSS-384 & USS Charr (SS-328) (AGSS-328) (IXSS-328)


 

ss349@inbox.com


Click above for larger image


USS Dentuda (SS 335) - SR, SA(SG), SN(SG), TMSN(SG): 1965 to 1967, my Sub Div 12-31 Reserve Boat

SS-335 USS Dentuda - More information

USS Dentuda (SS-335)
USS Dentuda (SS-335), originally named Capidoli, was renamed Dentuda on 24 September 1942, launched on 10 September 1944 by Electric Boat Company, Groton, Connecticut; sponsored by Mrs. T. W. Hogan, wife of Commander Hogan; and commissioned on 30 December 1944, Commander John S. McCain, Jr., in command. Dentuda is the Spanish name for the Shortfin Mako, a large shark found in temperate and subtropical waters.
Wikipedia

Her shakedown was extended by two months of experimental duty for the Submarine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. She sailed 5 April 1945 for the Pacific, arriving at Pearl Harbor 10 May. From 29 May to 29 July she conducted her first war patrol in the East China Sea and the Taiwan Straits, damaging a large freighter, and sinking two patrol craft. Dentuda remained at Pearl Harbor until 3 January 1946 when she sailed for the west coast. She arrived at San Francisco 5 days later.

Assigned to JTF 1 as a test vessel for Operation "Crossroads," Dentuda returned to Pearl Harbor 14 February 1946, and on 22 May sailed for Bikini Atoll. She underwent both atomic weapons tests with her crew safely away from their submarine, and returned to Pearl Harbor 5 September. On 7 October she got underway for Mare Island Naval Shipyard, arriving 14 October. She was decommissioned 11 December 1946 and stationed in the 12th Naval District for the training of members of the Naval Reserve.

Dentuda's single war patrol was designated as "successful"; and she received one battle star for her contribution to the success of the Okinawa operation.
(New 07-04-13)

NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive

Dentuda (SS-335) (AGSS-335)

Radio Call Sign: November - Kilo - Foxtrot - Echo

Balao Class Submarine: Laid down, 18 November 1943, at the Electric Boat Company, Groton, CT.; Launched, 10 September 1944; Commissioned USS Dentuda (SS-335), 30 December 1944; Decommissioned, 11 December 1946 and placed in service as a Naval Reserve Training Vessel in the 12th Naval District, (Hunters Point Navy Shipyard); Reclassified Auxiliary Research Submarine (AGSS-335) in 1962; Placed out of service, 30 June 1967; Struck from the Naval Register, 12 February 1969; Final Disposition, sold for scrapping, 12 February 1969. to Zidell Explorations of Portland OR. for $55,459.00. Dentuda earned one battle star for World War II service.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,242 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10kts; Submerged Endurance, 48 hours at 2kts; Operating Depth, 400 ft; Complement 6 Officers, 60 Enlisted; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, one 5"/25 deck gun, one 40mm gun, one 20mm gun, two .50 cal. machine guns; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Propulsion, diesel-electric reduction gear with four main generator engines, General Motors diesel engines, HP 5400, Fuel Capacity 118,000, four General Electric motors, HP 2,740, two 126-cell main storage batteries, two propellers.

(New 11-30-12)

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USS Dentuda SS-385
Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, CA

http://www.submarinesailor.com/Boats/Reserve/Reserve.asp


(Dentuda pulling into Hunters Point, 1946 - Courtesy Larry Derouin)

Dentuda was decommissioned 11 December 1946 and stationed in the 12th Naval District (HUNTER's POINT NAVAL SHIPYARD) for use as a Naval Reserve Training Boat. Dentuda was stricken and sold for scrap February 12, 1969 to Zidell Explorations of Portland Or. for $55,459.00 .

Note: Assigned to JTF 1 as a test vessel for Operation "Crossroads," Dentuda returned to Pearl Harbor 14 February 1946, and on 22 May sailed for Bikini Atoll. She underwent both atomic weapons tests with her crew safely away from their submarine, and returned to Pearl Harbor 6 September. On 7 October she got underway for Mare Island Naval Shipyard, arriving 14 October. She was decommissioned 11 December 1946 and stationed in the 12th Naval District for the training of members of the Naval Reserve.

Boats at the Bikini test were:

USS Apogon (SS-308) sunk by Test Baker at Bikini, 25 July 1946.

USS Dentuda (SS-335) sent to West Coast, sold for scrap, 20 January 1969.

USS Parche (SS-384) sent to West Coast, sold for scrap, July 1970.

USS Pilotfish (SS-386) sunk by Test Baker at Bikini, 25 July 1946.

USS Searaven (SS-196) sunk as target off California, 11 September 1948.

USS Skate (SS-305) scuttled off California, 5 October 1948.

USS Skipjack (SS-184) sunk as target off California, 11 August 1948.

USS Tuna (SS-203) scuttled off California, 24 September 1948.

Atomic Bomb Tests - Bikini Atoll - 1946

The Dentuda may be the boat visible in the highlighted square. Click here for a larger view.

(New 02-10-13)

 


USS Raton (AGSS 270) - SN(SG): Late in 1965, my 1st boat and without pay voluntary Reserve 2 week duty local ops off Southern California

NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patch on left courtesy of Don McGrogan, BMCS, USN (ret.) Other patches contributed by Mike Smolinski

Raton (SS-270) (SSR-270) (AGSS-270)

Radio Call Sign: November - Whiskey - Delta - Foxtrot

Gato Class Submarine: Laid down, 29 May 1942, at Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co, Manitowoc, WI.; Launched, 24 January 1943; Commissioned USS Raton (SS-270), 13 July 1943; Decommissioned, 11 March 1949, at New London, CT.; Laid up in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, New London Group; Towed to Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Philadelphia, PA. for conversion to a Radar Picket Submarine; Redesignated (SSR-270), 18 July 1952; Recommissioned, USS Raton (SSR-270), 21 September 1953; Reclassified Auxiliary Research Submarine (AGSS-270), 1 July 1960; Decommissioned at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, CA., and struck from the Naval Register, 28 June 1969; Final Disposition, sold for scrapping to American Ship Dismantlers Corp., Portland, OR. for 37,128.00 on 10 December 1973. Removed 12/15/73. Raton received 6 battle stars for World War II service.
Partial data submitted by Ron Reeves, HTC, USNR (ret.)

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,424 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Complement 6 Officers 54 Enlisted; Operating Depth, 300 ft; Submerged Endurance, 48 hrs at 2 kts; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10 kts; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, one 3"/50 deck gun, two .50 cal. machine guns, two .30 cal. machine guns; Propulsion, diesel electric reduction gear with four General Motors main generator engines, 5,400HP, Fuel Capacity, 116,000 gal., four General Electric main motors, 2,740HP, two 126-cell main storage batteries, twin propellers.

(New 11-30-12)

After overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, from 7 July to 24 November 1958, and underway training, the submarine deployed to the 7th Fleet from early March 1959 to mid-November, participating in operations with SEATO and the Japanese Maritime Defense Force.
The Raton (SS-270) is shown underway, possibly off Guam on 9 Nov. 1959.

(New 11-30-12)

Migraine III SSR Conversion - Radar Picket
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Starboard side view of the Raton (SS-270) underway, possibly of Hawaii, circa 1950's.

(New 11-30-12)

USS Raton (AGSS-270)

The first sequence is of Raton alongside Broadway Pier in San Diego, California prior to leaving on deployment to the Western Pacific on 3 July, 1961. The second sequence is of Raton stopped on the 180th meridian on 19 July, 1961 conducting swim call and having a barbecue to celebrate crossing the International Date Line and entering the realm of the Golden Dragon. The film was shot by Russell Ogle, Clairemont High, Class of 1960, a member of the crew, using a hand held 8mm Super 8 movie camera.
 

(New 11-30-12)

USS Raton in Bungo Straights

This video is of my father, who is still living, and I have forwarded this to him. How exciting to see this on You Tube, thank you SO much for posting it. My dad is Mike Bennett, the smiling guy in this video. Since your dad took this video, Im sure he and my dad mustve been friends, and Im sure he will be so happy to see this. Thanks again!

My father, Charles E. Overson served aboard the USS Raton. He passed away on March 26, 1991. He was proud to serve with the men of the USS Raton.

(New 12-01-12)

USS Raton in Tokyo Bay

(New 12-04-12)

From: Candido Gutierrez

 

My middle son, Eddie who is also a submariner was watching the super 8 movies I made when I was in the Navy and was really impressed with this one. He took it and had it transferred to a DVD and installed it in his computer, did quite a bit of editing and attached a song by Tommy Cox. He then put it on You Tube and sent it to me. This clip is from the movie I took of the USS Raton as we were returning to San Diego, CA from Yankee Station off South Vietnam the end of 1964 (I believe). Some of you shipmates of mine might want to check and correct me if I’m a little off on the year. Oh! Ed was on the Honolulu SSN 718 out of Pearl Harbor in the early 1990s. He won’t tell me what he did during the Gulf War. When my grandkids ask me what I did during the war, I can just show them this clip.

Candie

 

Westpac '66
Video

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USS Raton.m4v

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USS Raton (AGSS-270) crew memories

Memories and Thoughts on USS Raton's WestPac Cruises & Other News &Times

Photos of USS Raton (AGSS 270) model


Bill Decker recalls coming aboard Ration in January 1964

Dancing Bear and the "Rat"

Dancing Bear remembered and Raton collisions at dock and Tender

Here are a couple more dancing Bear Tales
 

First Radarman, Darrell Kibby, on Raton in early 1946

LCDR Bill Bourne, C.O. of Raton

Loss and return of the Raton Rat

Memories from Kenneth Shaum, Raton Shipmate

Raton's tipsy maneuvering watch

Raton Antics

Raton crew painted USS Salmon upper rudder blushing pink in the Summer of 1959

Raton Volley Ball Team

Stories of Officers and Up and Down Angles on Raton

USS Raton Target AGSS 270

USS Raton 1961 WestPac Trip memories recalled by Bill Rice

USS Raton Army Special Forces Team member recalls days aboard in May 1959

USS Raton memories of ROK Marines on board

Water and more Water coming in on Raton

WHO REMEMBERS RUSS SEARS 64-66?

 


USS Rock (AGSS 274) - SN(SG): 1966, my 2nd boat Reserve 2 week duty local ops off Southern California

NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patches contributed by Mike Smolinski

Rock (SS-274) (SSR-274) (AGSS-274)

Radio Call Sign: November - Whiskey - Lima - Golf
Tactical Voice Radio Call: "RECORD RUN"
 

Gato Class Submarine: Laid down, 23 December 1942, at Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.; Launched, 20 June 1943; Commissioned USS Rock (SS-274), 26 October 1943; Decommissioned, 1 May 1946, at New London, CT.; Laid up in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet; Converted to a Radar Picket Submarine at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard; Reclassified, (SSR-274), 18 July 1952; Recommissioned, 12 October 1953, at Philadelphia, PA.; Reclassified Auxiliary Submarine (AGSS-274), 31 December 1959; Decommissioned, 13 September 1969, at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA.; Struck from the Naval Register, 13 September 1969; Final Disposition, designated for use as a target. Rock earned four battle stars for World War II service.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,424 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Complement 6 Officers 54 Enlisted; Operating Depth, 300 ft; Submerged Endurance, 48 hrs at 2 kts; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10 kts; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, one 3"/50 deck gun, two .50 cal. machine guns, two .30 cal. machine guns; Propulsion, diesel electric reduction gear with four General Motors main generator engines, HP 5400, Fuel Capacity, 116,000 gals., four General Electric main motors, HP 2740, two 126-cell main storage batteries, twin propellers.

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Starboard view of the Rock (SS-274), underway circa 1960's.

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Migraine III SSR Conversion - Radar Picket

Migraine III

By this time, the Cold War with the Soviet Union was in full swing, and air defense of U.S. carrier battle groups on potential strike missions near the Russian landmass generated a requirement for even more submarine radar pickets.

Eventually, six more World War II submarines – all Manitowac-built USS Gato (SS-212)-class boats – were chosen for the more drastic MIGRAINE III SSR conversion. Because experience had shown that even the newer SSR configurations were seriously cramped, the final MIGRAINE design called for cutting the boats in two and inserting a 24-foot “plug” to get additional room for an expanded CIC and electronic spaces forward of the main control room. Even so, the MIGRAINE IIIs also had to sacrifice their after torpedo tubes for more berthing space, but they were fitted with a larger, streamlined sail, with the BPS-2 search radar mounted aft of the periscopes and other masts. An AN/BPS-3 height-finder radar on a pedestal just behind the sail and an AN/URN-3 TACAN beacon on the afterdeck completed the installation. The six MIGRAINE III boats were all converted at the Philadelphia Navy Yard between 1951 and 1953 – giving the Navy a total of ten radar picket submarines to face the growing Soviet threat just as the Korean War was drawing to a close.

The Rock keel was laid down 23 December 1942, at Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.; Launched, 20 June 1943; Commissioned 26 October 1943; Decommissioned, 1 May 1946, at New London, CT.; Laid up in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

In early 1951 Rock was towed from New London to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, where she was converted to a radar picket submarine by bisecting her at the forward bulkhead of the control room and inserting a 30-foot (9 m) section between the control room and the forward battery to house the new CIC and the majority of her new electronic equipment. Reclassified (SSR-274) on 18 July 1952, Rock recommissioned at Philadelphia 12 October 1953.

Rock was reclassified to an Auxiliary general submarine (AGSS-274), 1959–1969

On 13 September 1969, Rock decommissioned at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. Struck from the Navy List on the same day, she was designated for use as a target for destruction.

Boats Converted:

USS Pompon (SS-267) Gato
USS Rasher (SS-269) Gato
USS Raton (SS-270) Gato
USS Ray (SS-271) Gato
USS Redfin (SS-272) Gato
USS Rock (SS-274) Gato

 

USS Rock (SSR-274) Gato Class
USS Rock (SSR-274) Migraine III

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USS Rock (SS-274)

 

SubVest.com::Challenge Coins::Gato::USS Rock (SS-274)

USS Rock (SS-274)

View detailed images (2)

USS Rock (SS-274)

The USS Rock (SS/SSR/AGSS-274), a Gato-class submarine, was a ship of the United States Navy to be named for the rock, a striped bass found in the Chesapeake Bay region and elsewhere along the Atlantic Coast. Rock (SS-274) was laid down by the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, Wisc., 23 December 1942; launched 20 June 1943; sponsored by Mrs. B. O. Wells, and commissioned 26 October 1943, Comdr. John Jay Flachsenhar in command. After a month of intensive training in Lake Michigan, Rock passed through the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (at the time known as the Chicago Drainage Canal) to Lockport, Ill. There she entered a floating drydock for her voyage down the Mississippi River. She arrived in New Orleans on 29 November 1943, and got underway 6 days later for Panama, where she received further training before sailing for Pearl Harbor on 2 January 1944. Following voyage repairs Rock departed from Pearl Harbor for her first war patrol on 8 February 1944

(New 11-30-12)

USS ROCK (274)

Keel Laid - December 23, 1942

Launched - June 20, 1943

Commissioned - October 26, 1943

USS Rock made six war patrols in the Pacific during World War II, earning four Battle Stars. She sank one ship and damaged 42,282 tons of shipping. On February 29, 1944, Rock endured a four hour depth charging after a failed run in with a destoyer. The periscopes were severely damaged and the bridge was riddled with shrapnel. The damage forced them to return to Pearl Harbor for repairs.

In 1951 Rock was converted to a Migrain III type radar picket submarine. The hull was lengthened 30 feet by cutting the hull in half just ahead of the Control Room bulkhead and adding a new section to the hull. This was done to make room for additional electronic equipment. Rock was recommissioned in 1953 and served as an Auxiliary General Submarine (AGSS) out of San Diego, CA before being stricken from the Naval Register in 1969.

The Commissioning crew of USS Rock


NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patches contributed by Mike Smolinski

Tiru (SS-416)
Keel Laying - Launching

Radio Call Sign: November - Kilo - Sierra - November

Balao Class Submarine: Laid down, 17 April 1944, at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA.; Launched, 16 September 1947; Completed as a Guppy type submarine; Commissioned USS Tiru (SS-416), 1 September 1948; FRAM conversion to a Guppy III submarine, 4 May 1959 to 31 December 1959, at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, Honolulu, HI.; Decommissioned and struck from the Naval Register, 1 July 1975; Final Disposition, sunk as a target 19 July 1979. Sunk at 36deg 53' N x 71deg. 15.3' W By MK 48 ADCAP from Silversides (SSN-679) East of Cape Hatteras, NC.
Partial data submitted by Ron Reeves, HTC, USNR (ret.)

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced 1,526 t., Submerged 2,391 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10 kts; Submerged Endurance, 48 hours at 2 kts; Operating Depth, 400 ft; Complement 6 Officers 60 Enlisted; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, one 5"/25 deck gun, one single 40mm gun mount, one single 20mm gun mount, two .50 cal. machine guns; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Propulsion, diesel-electric reduction gear, four Fairbanks-Morse diesel engines, 5,400hp, Fuel Capacity, 116,000 gal., four Elliot Motor Co. electric main motors 2,740hp, two 126-cell main storage batteries, two propellers.

(New 12-04-12)

NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive

Commissioning - Active Service

(New 12-04-12)


 

USS Tiru (SS-416) Guppy Submarine


Tiru was completed as a Guppy II in 1948, then refitted as a Guppy III in 1959. She remained in service until 1975.

Guppy (greater underwater propulsive power), a U.S. Navy program to upgrade the underwater speed and endurance of existing boats, was stimulated by studies of captured German Type XXI submarines. The program included three major phases. Guppy I, essentially experimental, involved only two boats. They both became part of the main program, Guppy II, which converted 24 boats during the late 1940s and early 1950s. The key features were extensive streamlining, more batteries, and a snorkel air-breathing system. Beginning in 1959, nine of the Guppy IIs underwent refitting as Guppy IIIs with lengthened hulls to accommodate new sonar and electronics.
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(New 11-30-12)

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USS Tiru SS-416 is sunk by torpedo

http://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08416b.htm

A collage of photos depicting the Tiru (SS-416) about to be hit, striking and then sinking after being used as a weapons test for the Mark 48 torpedo as a target off Norfolk, VA., 19 July 1979.
Stephen Alexander who was aboard Silversides (SSN-679) wrote the following about the Tiru's last dive when they fired the standard Mk 48 torpedo at Tiru after a Type IIB periscope approach in 1979.

The CO was the approach officer as you might imagine. I’ll never forget that day. We could hear her braking up over the WQC underwater telephone and in SONAR as she went down in about 2500 fathoms. It was, to say the least, an eery and sobering experience! May she rest in peace and I thank the Lord that it was a SINKEX, and nobody was aboard except a radio-controlled “Iron Mike!”

Your website said that Tiru was sunk with a Mark 48 ADCAP, but for the record, that’s not the case. It was a randomly selected, “off-the-shelf” so to speak, standard Mk 48 as required by the SINKEX opord.

I don’t remember the mod if it was higher than zero, but it definitely wasn’t an ADCAP. In fact the ADCAP wasn't deployed to the fleet until after I left active duty in 1984.

BTW, the shoot was actually delayed by about 4 hours because as we were making our first approach, we spotted a merchant just coming over the horizon.

The SRV Ortolan then tried to contact the merchant, but to no avail. We had already gotten a firing solution on him via SONAR long before we had a visual, and his projected track went right through the firing range, a 25-mile radius circle in the middle of the ocean.

The merchant had wandered into it despite weeks of notices to mariners warning to stay out of that area for several days before and after the SINEX was scheduled. Maybe she was a spy, we wondered. Anyway Tiru had been towed to the range by the Ortolan, as I recall, ironically, and she didn’t have much fuel aboard.

All but one engine had been unshipped. Ortolan's helo controlled Tiru by radio for her run across the firing range. We had only loaded enough fuel for her last run because we didn’t want an unnecessary oil spill in the ocean.

So after the merchant finally steamed away, we had to turn Tiru around and send her back through harm's way one more time.

This time it was for good.

Text contributed by Steve Alexander, LT, USNR, Ret.
Photo courtesy of Michael Staehle.

Click photo above for larger image and better views of inset images

(Updated 02-13-13)


USS Diodon (SS-349) - my active duty "Qualified in Submarines" boat

NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patch contributed by Mike Smolinski

Diodon (SS-349)

Radio Call Sign: November - Kilo - Foxtrot - Hotel

Balao Class Submarine: Laid down, 1 June 1944, at the Electric Boat Co., Groton, CT.; Launched, 10 September 1945; Commissioned USS Diodon (SS-349), 18 March 1946; Guppy conversion, 1947-48, at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, CA.; Decommissioned and simultaneously struck from the Naval Register, 15 January 1971; Final Disposition, sold for scrapping, 12 May 1972 to Nicolai Joffe, Beverly Hills, CA for $ 106,378.00 & Scrapped in San Pedro, CA.
Partial data submitted by Ron Reeves, HTC, USNR (ret.)

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,242 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10kts; Submerged Endurance, 48 hours at 2kts; Operating Depth, 400 ft; Complement 6 Officers, 60 Enlisted; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, one 5"/25 deck gun, one 40mm gun, one 20mm gun, two .50 cal. machine guns; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Propulsion, diesel-electric reduction gear with four main generator engines., General Motors diesel engines, HP 5400, Fuel Capacity 118,000, four General Electric motors, HP 2,740, two 126-cell main storage batteries, two propellers.

Guppy IIA conversion: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,242 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10kts; Submerged Endurance, 48 hours at 2kts?; Operating Depth, 410 ft; Complement 6 Officers, 60 Enlisted; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, two .50 cal. machine guns; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Propulsion, diesel-electric reduction gear with three main generator engines., General Motors diesel engines, HP 5400, Fuel Capacity 118,000, four General Electric motors, HP 2,740, four 126-cell main storage batteries, two propellers.
Text provided by James R. Santos.

Diodon (SS-349) coming into or out of Hunter's Point, San Francisco Naval Ship Yard, 30 August 1965.


USS Bluegill (AGSS 242) - TM2(SS): Late 1968, my 5th boat Reserve 2 week duty local ops off Southern California

USS Bluegill (SS 242) web page (New 11-30-12)

USS Bluegill (AGSS 242) web page (New 11-30-12)

NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patches contributed by Mike Smolinski

Bluegill (SS-242) (SSK-242) (AGSS-242)

Radio Call Sign: November - Bravo - Golf - Lima

Gato Class Submarine: Laid down, 17 December 1942, at the Electric Boat Co., Groton, CT.; Launched, 8 August 1943; Commissioned USS Bluegill (SS-242), 11 November 1943; Decommissioned, 1 March 1946, at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA.; Laid up in the Pacific Reserve Fleet; Recommissioned, 3 May 1951; Decommissioned, 7 July 1952, for conversion to a Hunter-Killer Submarine; Recommissioned, USS Bluegill (SSK-242), 2 May 1953; Re-designated (SS-242) in August 1969; Reclassified Auxiliary Submarine (AGSS-242) in April 1966; Decommissioned and struck from the Naval Register, 28 June 1969; Final Disposition, scuttled, 3 December 1970, at Lahaina, Maui, HI. Bluegill received the Navy Unit Commendation and was awarded four battle stars for World War II service.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,424 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Complement 6 Officers 54 Enlisted; Operating Depth, 300 ft; Submerged Endurance, 48 hrs at 2 kts; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10 kts; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, one 3"/50 deck gun, two .50 cal. machine guns, two .30 cal. machine guns; Propulsion, diesel electric reduction gear with four General Motors main generator engines, 5,400HP, Fuel Capacity, 97,140 gal., four General Electric main motors, 2,740HP, two 126-cell main storage batteries, twin screws.

(New 12-04-12)


Bluegill (SSK-242), underway, date and place unknown.

(New 12-04-12)

Sail away: As many different types of sails as there are boats in this photo of Squadron 12, Key West Fla, in Mid 60's: Atule (SS-403), Balao (SS-285), Grenadier (SS-525) & Bluegill (SS-242).

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Photo of the decommissioning ceremonies aboard Bluegill (SS-242) 7 July 1952, for conversion to a Hunter-Killer Submarine. The Rock (SS-274) is behind her.


USS Razorback (SS 394) - TM2(SS): 1969, my 6th boat Reserve 2 week duty local ops off Southern California

NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive



Second patch on left courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org., all other patches courtesy of Mike Smolinski

Razorback (SS-394)

Radio Call Sign: November - Kilo - November - Xray

Balao Class Submarine: Laid down, 9 September 1943, at Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, ME.; Launched, 27 January 1944; Commissioned USS Razorback (SS-394), 3 April 1944; She was one of twelve United States submarines present in Tokyo Bay during the Surrender Ceremony on 2 September 1945. In August 1952, Razorback Decommissioned to undergo Guppy IIA modifications. Re-commissioned in January 1952, she underwent shakedown and post overhaul training at New London, CT. On 24 May 1954, Razorback reported for duty at San Diego, CA. Under terms of the Security Assistance Program, she again Decommissioned on 30 November 1970 at Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard in San Francisco, CA; struck from the Naval Vessel Registry and was transferred (sale) to the Republic of Turkey.
Concurrently, the ex- Razorback was Commissioned as TGC Muratreis (S-336) of the Turkish Navy. In 1974, Muratreis (S-336) departed the Golcuk Navy Yard, Turkey under combat conditions as a participant in the "Cyprus Peace Operations".
Decommissioned from the Turkish Navy on 8 August 2001, she was laid up at Golcuk awaiting final disposition. Through the efforts of various veteran and civic organizations, the veteran submarine was purchased from the Turkish Government for the scrap price of $37,500. After receiving seaworthiness overhaul at a shipyard in Tuzla, Turkey, the ex- Razorback again put to sea (under tow) on 5 May 2004.
After departure, she made port calls in Gibraltar and Key West, FL and arrived at her final berth at the Arkansas Inland Maritime Museum, North Little Rock, AR on 16 July 2004. Since July 2005, ex-Razorback/ex-Muratreis has been open to the public.
Razorback received five battle stars for World War II service, and four stars for Vietnam service.
Researched by CTRC Donald J. Wagner, USN (Ret.) for NavSource.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced 1,526 t., Submerged 2,391 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10 kts; Submerged Endurance, 48 hours at 2 kts; Operating Depth, 400 ft; Complement 6 Officers 60 Enlisted; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, one 5"/25 deck gun, one single 40mm gun mount, one single 20mm gun mount, two .50 cal. machine guns; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Propulsion, diesel-electric reduction gear, four Fairbanks-Morse diesel engines, 5,400 HP, Fuel Capacity, 116,000 gal., four Elliot Motor Co. electric main motors with 2,740 shp, two 126-cell main storage batteries, two propellers.

Assisted by a tug nudging her towards the dock, the Razorback (SS-394), proceeds to tie up.

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Port side view of the Razorback (SS-394) after GUPPY IIA conversion, circa 1960's off Hawaii.

(Updated 12-04-12)

Assisted by a tug nudging her towards the dock, the Razorback (SS-394), proceeds to tie up.


USS Baya (SS-318) - TM2(SS): 1970, my 7th boat Reserve 1 week duty local ops off Southern California

NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patch on left depicting F.C. Wyse was probably drawn by Lt. Robert Gulman & contributed by Lester Palifka, on right by Mike Smolinski.

Baya (SS-318) (AGSS-318)

Radio Call Sign: November - Zulu - Oscar - Victor

Balao Class Submarine: Laid down, 8 April 1943, at the Electric Boat Company, Groton, CT.; Launched, 2 January 1944; Commissioned USS Baya (SS-318), 20 May 1944; Decommissioned, 14 May 1946, at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA.; Laid up in the Pacific Reserve Fleet, Mare Island Group; Recommissioned, 10 February 1948; Reclassified Auxiliary Research Submarine (AGSS-318), 12 August 1949; Decommissioned and struck from the Naval Register, 30 October 1972; Final Disposition, sold for scraping , 12 October 1973, to National Metal and Steel Company, Terminal Island, CA., for $142,615. Baya received four battle stars for her World War II service.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,242 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10kts; Submerged Endurance, 48 hours at 2kts; Operating Depth, 400 ft; Complement 6 Officers, 60 Enlisted; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, one 5"/25 deck gun, one 40mm gun, one 20mm gun, two .50 cal. machine guns; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Propulsion, diesel-electric reduction gear with four main generator engines, General Motors diesel engines, HP 5400, Fuel Capacity 118,000, four General Electric motors, HP 2,740, two 126-cell main storage batteries, two propellers.
Specs after her 1964 conversion: Length Overall and Max. Breadth: 330 ft. x 27 ft. 4 in. Displacement: surfaced - 2220 tons, submerged - 2600 tons (approx.) Max Speed: surfaced 10.5 knots, submerged 8 knots (rated) Propulsion: Diesel-electric direct with three main generator engines (one removed) 3430 shp surfaced, two slow-speed main motors (reduction gear removed) 2740 shp submerged.

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File:USS Baya (AGSS-318) in 1962.jpeg

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Baya (AGSS-318) starboard view entering Hawaiian waters, in one of her final configurations, with three shark-fin arrays as test ship for the Wide Aperture Array system, or WAA. This photo was taken in the 1968-71 timeframe. Despite her appearance and contrary to statements in some texts, this is NOT a prototype for the BQG-4 PUFFS. WAA was actually a later outgrowth of PUFFS. By this time, Baya had been completely de-militarized, with all fire-control and weapons equipment removed. USN photo courtesy of subvetsofwwii.org,text by QM2(SS) David Johnston, USNR

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USS Greenfish (SS 351) - TM2(SS): 1971, my 9th boat and last 2 week Reserve duty in Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, CA

NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive

Greenfish (SS-351)

Radio Call Sign: November - Juliet - Tango - Tango

Balao Class Submarine: Laid down, 29 June 1944, at the Electric Boat Co., Groton, CT.; Launched, 21 December 1945; Commissioned USS Greenfish (SS-351), 7 June 1946; Guppy conversion in 1948 at Electric Boat Works, Groton, CT.; FRAM overhaul and Guppy III conversion, 15 December 1960 to 28 July 1961, at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, Honolulu, HI.; Decommissioned, struck from the Naval Register, and transferred (sold) under terms of the Security Assistance Program to Brazil, 19 December 1973, renamed Amazonas (S-16); Final Disposition, struck from the Brazilian Navy, 15 October 1992, and scrapped on 30/01/2004 at the Niteroi shipyard.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,242 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10kts; Submerged Endurance, 48 hours at 2kts; Operating Depth, 400 ft; Complement 6 Officers, 60 Enlisted; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, one 5"/25 deck gun, one 40mm gun, one 20mm gun, two .50 cal. machine guns; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Propulsion, diesel-electric reduction gear with four main generator engines., General Motors diesel engines, HP 5400, Fuel Capacity 118,000, four General Electric motors, HP 2,740, two 126-cell main storage batteries, two propellers.

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The USN Submarine Reserve submarine to which I returned from Active Duty on the USS Diodon SS-349 in October 1968 - the USS Parche (SS-384) (AGSS-384)

NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patches contributed by Mike Smolinski. Patch on right by Don McGrogan, BMCS, USN (ret.)

Parche (SS-384) (AGSS-384)

Radio Call Sign: November - Juliet - Victor - Whiskey

Balao Class Submarine: Laid down, 9 April 1943, at Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, ME.; Launched, 24 July 1943; Commissioned USS Parche (SS-384), 20 November 1943; Decommissioned, 11 December 1946; Assigned to duty as a Naval Reserve Training ship at Alameda, CA., circa March 1947; Reclassified as an Auxiliary Research Submarine (AGSS-384); Relieved of duty as a Naval Reserve Training ship, circa late 1969; Struck from the Naval Register, 8 November 1969. Final Disposition, sold for scrapping 18 June 1970 to Zidell Portland, OR for $ 74.580.00. Parche received five battle stars for World War II service.
Partial data submitted by Ron Reeves, HTC, USNR (ret.)

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,391 t.; Length 311' 8"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10kts; Submerged Endurance, 48 hours at 2kts; Operating Depth, 400 ft; Complement 6 Officers, 60 Enlisted; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, one 5"/25 deck gun, one 40mm gun, one 20mm gun, two .50 cal. machine guns; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Propulsion, diesel-electric reduction gear with four main generator engines., Fairbanks-Morse diesel engines, HP 5400, Fuel Capacity 116,000, four Elliot Motor Co. electric motors, HP 2,740, two 126-cell main storage batteries, two propellers.

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USS Parche SS-384
Alameda CA

"The USS Parche SS384 was a reserve boat from 1947 till 1969. It was located in Alameda, Ca.

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On Eternal Patrol - Lost Submariners of World War II 
Harris Palmer Leffler

 

Harris Palmer Leffler

 

Rank/Rate Motor Machinist's Mate, Second Class
Service Number 603 38 37
Birth Date October 25, 1921
From Washington, D. C.
Decorations Navy and Marine Corps Medal
Submarine USS Parche (SS-384)
Loss Date February 10, 1945
Location Enroute to Midway from patrol area
Circumstances Swept overboard while converting a fuel tank
to a ballast tank
Remarks  

Photo courtesy of Paul W. Wittmer.  Information courtesy of Dale Mielke, shipmate.

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Heroic War Patrol Recalled of USS Parche
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Patrol 4: LCDR Dana Andrews, USS Parche (SS-384) - COMPLETE ...
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Ships of the U.S. Navy, 1940-1945 SS-384 USS Parche
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Parche - Naval History and Heritage Command
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Submarine Hero - Lawson P. "Red" Ramage
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USS Parche (SS 384) History

USS Parche SS 384
 
Parche fish
USS Parche (SS 384) was the first U.S. Navy ship to bear the name of the small, four-eyed butterfly fish known as the Parche (chaetodon capistratus).  Butterfly fishes are found among tropical reefs around the world but are concentrated in the Indo-Pacific oceanic region. The Parche is known for its uncanny ability to swim in and around coral heads and reefs as the fish is able to find its way through the most intricate passages by swimming on its side or upside down.

The submarine Parche was a Balao class boat built by the Portsmouth, New Hampshire Navy Yard. Her keel was laid on the 9th of April 1943 and she was launched on July 24th. Miss Betty Russell smashed the traditional bottle of champagne across the bow as Parche slid into the water for the first time. Miss Russell was the daughter of the U.S. District Judge Robert Lee Russell, formerly Judge Advocate General of the Navy. Parche was commissioned on November 20th, 1943 with Commander Lawson P. "Red" Ramage commanding. The boat was also assigned the naval radio call sign that would identify Parche for the rest of her years: "NJVW".

 

Commemorative Submarine Launching Tag
Launching of USS Parche (SS 384) at Navy Yard, Portsmouth NH on 7/21/43

Parche became one of the most highly decorated ships of the famous World War II Pacific Submarine Force. She made six war patrols, earning five battle stars and two Presidential Unit Citation awards.
 

First War Patrol
USS Parche (SS 384) Underway
On 3/29/44, Parche left Pearl Harbor in company with USS Tinosa (SS 283) and USS Bang (SS 385) for her first war patrol. After topping off fuel tanks at Midway Island, the three boats reached the sea lanes south of Formosa on 4/16. On 29 April Bang reported a large convoy 50 miles (80 km) away, and the wolf pack attacked, Parche sinking one ship. Tinosa reported a seven-ship convoy on the morning of 5/3 and Parche headed north at full speed to intercept. An hour after midnight Parche was in position and scored three torpedo hits on the leading ship and two hits on the second freighter, sinking both. Parche scored two hits on the third freighter, which settled by the stern and began to list to port. Post-war records credited Parche with sinking the Taiyoku Maru and Shoryu Maru. After making a thorough photo reconnaissance of military installations on the island of Ishi Gaki Jima, Parche returned to Midway on 5/23/44 ending her successful first war patrol.
USS Parche (SS 384) underway.
 
Second War Patrol
Parche's second war patrol is her most celebrated. She departed Midway 6/17/44 following a quick refit and formed up with a new wolf pack consisting of USS Hammerhead (SS 364) and USS Steelhead (SS 280). The patrol area was once again south of Formosa. A week into the operation, Parche sank a patrol vessel with gunfire. A less than ideal 4th of July was spent being depth charged by a Japanese cruiser and a destroyer. On 7/29, Parche sighted a convoy and, along with Steelhead, began a running battle that would last for several days and gain great fame for the boat and her Skipper Red Ramage. Here is a detailed account of those events:

Parche engaged in a predawn attack on the Japanese convoy on 7/31.. During this daring night surface action, the 384 worked her way in inside two escorts and began an approach on a medium AK (attack transport) at 0354. The target slid by about 200 yards away and then turned to avoid two torpedoes Parche had fired at her. That move effectively blocked an escort who had crept in behind her and also opened up an opportunity for shots at two tankers and the AK. A stern shot took care of the cargo carrier and four bow tubes knocked out a tanker. CDR Ramage ordered "Right-Full Rudder" to bring the stern tubes to bear on the second oiler and fired three torpedoes. One missed ahead of the ship but the other two fish hit the forward section slowing down the tanker but not stopping her completely.

  The escorts opened up with deck guns, machineguns and flares firing in all directions. The convoy started to mill about smartly with Parche in the middle. Suddenly a medium sized merchant-man with a sizeable superstructure came in sight. The torpedo reload crews forward and aft reloaded tubes as fast as they could and Parche fired two tubes as soon as the outer doors were opened. The two torpedoes broke the merchant-mans back, which sent her down within a couple of minutes.

   With the merchant-man out of the way Parche came back after the first tanker to finish her off. Parche crossed her track astern at only 200 yards. At 500 yards the tanker opened up on Parche with everything she had, but her trim down by the bow kept her from depressing her guns enough to do any good. The small arms fire was peppering the bridge enough that Ramage sent all hands below except the quartermaster, who stuck to the after TBT until he had the set-up. At 800 yards Parche fired three torpedoes from the stern tubes at the tanker. All hit the tanker with terrific explosions effectively silencing the gunfire from that quarter. With five torpedoes in her the big tanker gave and went down leaving only a small oil fire.

   The two escorts on the port quarter were now concentrating their machine gun fire on Parche. Ramage was about to come right to put them astern and head for the prize of the evening, a huge transport, when she spotted a ship coming in sharp on the starboard bow apparently intent on ramming. Ordering a full bell, Ramage sent the boat shooting across in front of the on-rushing enemy, then halfway across its track he ordered "Right-Full Rudder" swinging right the stern of the boat out of its path. The Japanese sailors were yelling as Parche barely missed being rammed by less than 50 feet. All hands exchanged mutual cheers and jeers.

Parche, now boxed in on both sides by several small craft and the big transport dead ahead had no alternative but to fire straight down the transports throat. The first fish started off to the right, so Ramage checked fire, spotted on, and fired two more. These were right in the groove and both hit the transport stopping her cold. Closing in on her starboard bow, the Parche swung hard left and fired one stern shot at 800 yards for a bull’s eye.

   Stopping to take account of the situation, Ramage counted eight ships still visible on her RADAR screen. The bewildered escorts were still busy firing weapons in the darkness at Parche and at each other. The big transport was stopped and down by the bow, but showed no further signs of going down. Just as the 384 started back to deliver the felling blow, the transport suddenly raised its stern into the air and went straight down, head first into the cold depths of the ocean. Parche then began an egress from the area yet one of the escorts continually challenged her with weapons fire amid the sounds of loud explosions in the darkness. The entire attack took 46 minutes.

When Parche was finished, she had caused the Japanese ships to open fire at one another and had sunk a 10,238 ton tanker, a 4,471 ton passenger-cargo ship, damaged several thousand tons of Japanese ships, and disrupted yet another convoy. She had also worked with Steelhead to sink an 8,990 ton transport. What made this more incredible was that this all occurred from the middle of a convoy of ships, on the surface, and at night. On 8/1/44, the sub departed for Saipan where she moored 8/5 before arriving in Pearl Harbor on 8/16. For this action USS Parche received the Presidential Unit Citation and Commander Ramage (left, post-WW2 photo) was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor (see citation below). The Submarine Combat Insignia was also authorized for the patrol.

Third, Fourth and Fifth War Patrols
Parche's third war patrol, lasting from 9/10/44 to 12/2/44 was one of the longest of the war, yet disappointingly enough, the boat did not encounter any targets. Japanese shipping, decimated by continual submarine and air attacks, was becoming increasingly difficult to find.

After a refit, the ship got underway 12/30/44 for her fourth war patrol, this time in the Nansei Shoto. Parche discovered a freighter and a tanker at anchor in Naze Ko 0n 1/19/45, firing six bow tubes at the tanker for five distinct hits and four stern tubes at the freighter for two possible hits. On 2/7, Parche sighted and sank the 984-ton Okinoyama Maru. Following a 2/16 fueling stop at Midway, the384 continued onto Pearl Harbor where she arrived 2/20.

When Parche left Pearl on 3/19/45 on her fifth war patrol, she headed directly for the east coast of Honshū, Japan. The 384 sank 615-ton Minesweeper No. 3 off Kobe Zaki on 4/9. On 4/11, Parche attacked and sank a small freighter of about 800 tons with gunfire. She torpedoed another small vessel the next day. On 4/13, Parche sank a fishing trawler. Two hours later she again opened fire on a small observation boat, leaving it blazing stem to stern. During this attack, two Japanese aircraft caused her to crash dive, leaving all her guns loose and much of her ammunition exposed. A heavy explosion shook her on the way down, but inflicted no damage. On 4/22/45, Parche sighted three small tankers in column, proceeding north along the coast south of Okama Saki. Parche launched three torpedoes at the second tanker and then shifted to the third, which was left down by the stern covered with a cloud of smoke. The sub sailed for Midway, arriving 30 April.

Parche crewman paints Japanese flag by control room manifold.
Sixth War Patrol
Parche got underway 5/5/45 for her sixth and final war patrol. Her first tasking was "lifeguard duty" (standing by to rescue downed Allied airmen) south of Honshū. She stayed on station off Honshū until 18 June, ready to pick up any aviators who might be forced down. No rescues were necessary, and on the 18th the 384 proceeded to Tsugara Strait.

Her first torpedo contact came 6/21 when she sighted a gunboat rounding Shiriya Saki. The gunboat was soon joined by a sub chaser and then by a freighter. Picking the freighter as the best target, Parche launched four torpedoes from her forward tubes for one hit which threw up a veil of dense white smoke. Expecting counter-measures, the sub went under, accompanied by the breaking-up noises of freighter Hizen Maru.

Parche attacked three luggers escorted by a small flat vessel on the afternoon of the next day and sank two. She sank several trawlers by gunfire on 6/23. Two days later she sighted three large ships and six escorts headed north along the coast, one of the most tempting convoys seen for some months in Japanese home waters. After Parche's attack, the escorts subjected the boat to a four and a half hour depth charging before she managed to slip away. Resuming her patrol, Parche sunk an ex-gunboat and badly damaged another ship.

After another round of lifeguard duty for the carrier planes of Task Force 38 0n 7/17, Parche rendezvoused with USS Cero (SS 225) to take aboard three fliers and then set course for Midway, arriving 7/23. Parche completed on final war patrol of World War Two on 7/28/25, mooring in Pearl Harbor. Japan surrendered on 9/2/45.

Post-War
After World War Two, Parche was assigned to "Operation Crossroads" as a target ship for the atomic bomb tests at Bikini Atoll. Parche survived both the airburst and the underwater detonationt, coming through relatively undamaged.

This view of USS Parche (SS 384) is believed to have been photographed immediately following Operation Crossroads.

 

   After post-nuclear testing decontamination, Parche proceeded to Mare Island Naval Shipyard at Vallejo, California. She was then decommissioned on 12/10/46 and in March 1947 was moved to Alameda, California to join the moth ball fleet. On December 1st, 1962, the boat's classification was changed from SS to AGSS (Auxiliary Submarine). AGSS-384 was then assigned as a Naval Reserve Training Submarine in Oakland, California.

Parche was stricken from the Navy list on November 8th, 1969 and sold for scrap on June 18th, 1970. Prior to that however, the conning tower barrel, bridge structure, shears, and 5-inch/25 gun were removed and transported to the Naval Submarine Base, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii for permanent display.

Parche's conning tower being moved off the USS Chara (AE 31).

(New 07-04-13)


The very last USN Submarine Reserve submarine I was attached to, the USS Charr SS-328

NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patch on right courtesy of Mike Smolinski, other patches contributed by Ramon Samson

Charr (SS-328) (AGSS-328) (IXSS-328)

Radio Call Sign: November - Kilo - Delta - Charlie

Balao Class Submarine: Laid down, 26 August, 1943, at Electric Boat Co., Groton CT., as Bocaccio; Renamed Charr, 24 September 1942; Launched, 28 May 1944; Commissioned USS Charr (SS-328), 23 September 1944, Commander F. D. Boyle in command; Reclassified Auxiliary Submarine (AGSS-328) in 1966; Decommissioned, 28 June 1969; Reclassified Miscellaneous Submarine (IXSS-328) in 1971; Struck from the Naval Register, 20 December 1971; Final Disposition, sold for scrapping to Nicolai Joffe, Beverly Hills, CA for $ 105,381.00 & scrapped in Kearny, NJ. 17 August 1972. Charr received one battle star for her service during World War II.
Partial data submitted by Ron Reeves, HTC, USNR (ret.)

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,424 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10kts; Submerged Endurance, 48 hours at 2kts; Operating Depth, 400 ft; Complement 66; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, one 4"/50 or 5"/25 deck gun, one 40mm gun; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Propulsion, diesel-electric reduction gear with four General Motors main generator engines, 5,400hp, fuel capacity, 118,000 gal., four General Electric main motors with 2,740hp, two 126-cell main storage batteries, two propellers.

Raton (AGSS-270) and Bluegill (AGSS-242) during the decommissioning ceremony at Mare Island on 28 June 1969. Bream (AGSS-243), Tunny (AGS-282) and Charr (AGSS-328) are forward of Raton and Bluegill. Chara (AE-31) is in the background.

Note: Your Web Master served Reserve tours on the USS Raton AGSS-270 and USS Bluegill AGSS-242, seen below.

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Submarine Squadron 3 San Diego, Ca. 1949

Charr1949
USS Charr SS 328 moored to the Blower, San Diego, Ca 1949

Charr1949
USS Charr SS 328 conning tower close-up, San Diego, Ca 1949

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Charr (SS-328)
Submarine of the Balao class


USS Charr as modified after the war.
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USS Charr (SS-328)

USS Charr (SS/AGSS-328), a Balao-class submarine, was a ship of the United States Navy named for the charr, a trout of the waters of northwestern North America.

SS-328, originally designated Bocaccio, was renamed Charr on 24 September 1942 and launched 28 May 1944 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, Conn.; sponsored by Mrs. W. F. Orkney; and commissioned 23 September 1944, Commander F. D. Boyle in command.

USS Charr (SS-328) underway 1964.jpg
USS Charr (SS-328) in 1964

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USS Charr SS-328
Jerry Bliss, RMCM(SS): The USS CHARR replaced the USS PARCHE at Alameda Reserve Training Center and was the boat for Submarine Reserve Division 12-9. Alameda, California. I served aboard both boats during my USNR days.
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USS Charr SS-328
SS-328
, originally designated Bocaccio

This web site has been developed for the use of the veteran submariners of the

USS Charr, a diesel submarine that served our country well for 3 decades. Push a button on the left and take a look at the history of the Charr, a current roster of the crew members, some pictures and stories from the crew, information on the Alumni Association and next Reunion, and links to other Charr and submarine sites.
(New 07-04-13)

Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships
Office of the Chief of Naval Operations
Naval History Division • Washington

USS Charr (SS-328)

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USS Charr Alunni Association
(New 07-04-13)

Submarine Operations Research Group Attack Data
USS Charr (SS-328)
(New 07-04-13)

 

Ships of the U.S. Navy, 1940-1945 SS-328 USS Charr
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